The New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad



New Haven

The New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad connected two of the most famous cities in the US, New York and Boston. The New Haven mainline, from the railroad's namesake city, to the New York City area, was electrified with overhead 11kv, 25hz AC. Passenger trains gained access to New York either via The PRR, with a connection at Sunnyside Yard on Long Island, or via New York Central, connecting at Woodlawn, NY. The run from Woodlawn to Grand Central Terminal used NYC's Harlem Division which was electrified with 650VDC 3rd rail. New Haven's electric motive power had to be compatible with these different systems.

East of New Haven, all trains were pulled by conventional locomotives, first steam then diesel.

NYNH&H was also a pioneer in the development of lightweight passenger cars for general service. While most other railroads, like UP and CB&Q, were more interested in fixed articulated trainsets, The New Haven acquired from online builder, Pullman-Standard's Osgood-Bradley Works, several series of passenger cars that demonstrated the convenience of lightweight, roller bearing equipped cars, without the headaches of an articulated train. After the war, NH was instrumental in the development of the "outside swing hanger" type truck, that many railroads eventually adopted.

EP-4
mm/Trackbed
Type "Streamliner" Electric locomotive
Stats
ModelEP-4
BuilderGeneral Electric
Date Built1938
Road Numbers0361 - 0366 (later 361-366)
Image361
SchemePullman Green, with "Dulux Gold" markings
Notes

The EP-4s were The New Haven's second series of 2-C+C-2 passenger electrics. Arriving in 1938, they had a modern style for the time. While some may believe the design was influenced by the GG1, which was unveiled four years earlier. In fact, the design of the EP-4 and the GG1 were influenced by the NH locomotive's predecessor, the EP-3, which shared the wheel arrangement of the later classes, but had a box-like body.

The EP-4 could operate into Grand Central, over the NYC, by the use of third rail pickups, and a small third pantograph that collected DC current from overhead contacts, in sections of the Park Avenue tunnel, where track work made installation of third rail difficult. They could run on either AC or DC because of their series-wound "universal" motors. This type of motor can only "digest" low frequency AC, so the railroad had to produce its own power, 11,000 volts, 25hz AC, at a plant in Cos Cobb CT. Only when UM powered equipment was retired from the former NH and PRR electric zones (after the introduction of rectifier locomotives) was the railroad able to switch over to 60hz commercial power.

The EP-4s were retired after a fairly short period, by the inept management that followed the quirky but competent administration of Patrick McGinnis, in the late 50s. 20 years of service is nothing for an electric locomotive.

PA-1EP-4
mm/Trackbed
Type Passenger diesel locomotive
Stats
ModelPA-1
BuilderALCo
Date Built1948 - 1949
Road Numbers0750 - 0786
Images0763, 0761
SchemePullman Green, with "Dulux Gold" markings
Notes

ALCo was New Haven's favorite locomotive builder, both in the steam and diesel eras. Therefore, it's not surprising that PAs formed the bulk of NHs passenger fleet from the late '40s to the early '60s, when EMD FL9s quickly replaced them.

Deluxe CoachLong Range Coach
mm/Trackbed
Type "American Flyer" Deluxe Coach
Stats
BuilderPullman Standard, Osgood-Bradley Works
Date Built1934 - 1938
Road Numbers8200 - 8269, 8500 - 8529
SchemeForest Green, Hunter Green
Notes

In 1934, New Haven took delivery of the first of what would become one of the most distinctive and recognizable passenger car fleets in the nation. These first examples of this type were 80-seat coaches, designed for medium distance trains, like the Boston - NYC runs that were the core of New Haven's intercity passenger business.

These cars were immortalized in 1946, when A. C. Gilbert (who had previously invented the Erector Set, based on the construction of the catenary towers in NH's electrified zone) offered the first S-gauge American Flyer model train sets. The line of equipment included a 3/16" scale model of the 8200 series New Haven lightweight coach. These models became so recognizable that the prototype cars themselves became known as "American Flyer" cars

When delivered, these cars were painted a dark shade of green, known as "Forest Green", with the aluminum window frames unpainted. In the '50s, New Haven changed passenger paint colors several times. The last green scheme used a color known as "Hunter" green. In this scheme, the window frames were painted the same color as the car side, but the roof was black.

Commuter Coach
mm/Trackbed
Type Commuter Coach
Stats
BuilderPullman Standard, Osgood-Bradley Works
Date Built1936 - 1938
Road Numbers8270 - 8369
SchemeForest Green
Notes

The second group of lightweight coaches were configured with 92 seats, vs 80 in the Deluxe coaches. They had 11 windows per side, instead of the earlier cars' 10. These cars were intended for short distance commuter trains, while the Deluxe coaches ran in long range intercity trains.

Grill DinerGrill Diner
mm/Trackbed
Type "Grill" Dining Car
Stats
BuilderPullman Standard, Osgood-Bradley Works
Date Built1937
Road Numbers5200 - 5204
SchemeForest Green
Notes

These "Grill" diners served "fast food" to passengers on New Haven's local trains. They also had the distinction of being the first railroad diners partially crewed by women, as table service was provided by uniformed waitresses.

DMU and SMU

''The Comet'' DMU

Comet, 1935
mm/Trackbed

As Built, 1935

Comet, 1948
mm/Trackbed

Late Appearance, 1948

Besler Steam Train, SMU (Steam Multiple Unit)

Bessler Steam Train, LH
mm/Trackbed
Bessler Steam Train, RH
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